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illustration agency london
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Francesca Crespi
david lewis
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t: + 44 (0) 20 7435 7762
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m: + 44 (0) 7931 824 674
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e: david@davidlewisillustration.com
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w: davidlewisillustration.com
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w: david-lewis-illustration-agency.business.site
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vignettenativity
wedding
vignettewomanboycat
drummer
vignette fairy two
vignette angels
vignette opera
vignette fire bird
vignette donkey
vignette prince on horse
vignette fairy
vignette prince
vignette lovers
vignette hansel and gretel
vignette boy cat dog
vignette fairy hedgehog
vignette lion
vignette medieval dance
vignette magician
vignette towers
vignette dancers
vignette sprite
vignette two apples
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Gallery

History of Illustration

Origins - Illustration dates back thousands of years to early man with his cave paintings which were the foundations of both art and language. It would take many thousands of years for the transition from art to language to evolve as we know today, but the two remain inextricably entwinned as a form of narrative illustration. One cannot exist without the other even if text is not incuded within the illustration which intrinsically conveys language and thought. Early man's impressions may have been purely decorative and a reflection of the skill of someone intepreting the world around him in picture form. Equally, they could be regarded as the forerunners to our modern understanding of illustration as a means to convey a message. For example, the drawing of animals on cave walls may have been intended as a map for others to read and to know where such animals may be found for capture.

Literacy - For thousands of years, most people could not read or write until comparatively recent times. Without such skills, how did they learn? The church provides the answer. Walk into any old cathedral and you are likely to see towering windows of stained glass. These compositions very often depict scenes of biblical events. Therefore, the illiterate could feast their eyes on the magnificently illumuninated imagery. The written word may have been the preserve of the upper echelons of society, but stained glass windows were just as powerful at telling a story. Iliteracy was though no bar to opening a thumping great bible. Often, colourful illustrations and paintings were inserted between the pages of text to help convey the story and the first letter of a chapter may be embellished or illuminated for emphasise.

Influence - As societies have developed and become more sophisticated, illustration has evolved too. Whereas primitive man was proably acting on instinct when he draw on those cave walls, modern man is consiously and commercially using illustration as a means to influence. Such influence may be for good or for bad depending on which side of the fence you sit on. The former USSR, for example, produced posterised illustrations of stocky men and women of power designed to instill pride and motivation in their peoples.